Central Park: Images 1866-1870

One of my major projects in the past few years was writing more than 60 episodes (4-5 mins. each) for a videoguide app on Central Park, forthcoming from Guides Who Know. For the app, I collected hundreds of images of Central Park during the 19th century.  I find this year-by-year archival view fascinating, so I’m sharing it by uploading a half dozen or so images per week. See this page for links to all the pages of images.

To be notified when new images appear, follow me on Twitter @NYsculpture.

For blog posts on specific aspects of Central Park, click on Central Park in the Obsessions cloud at lower right. For an overview of the early years of the Park, see Central Park: The Early Years, which includes some of the images on these pages.

1866: Southern end of the Park

Bethesda Terrace viewed from the Ramble, with the placeholder fountain.

View of Bethesda Terrace and the Mall from the Lake, 1866. The simple fountain was replaced with Angel of the Waters in 1873.

Photos of designs for the reliefs on the ramps of the Terrace.

Photos of designs for the reliefs on the ramps of the Terrace, 1866. Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1867.

Proposed animal house.

Proposed animal house, 1866. Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1867.

Belvedere as originally planned.

Belvedere as originally planned, 1866. Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1867.

Plan for a rustic shelter for the use of children, southwest of the Mall.

Rustic shelter for the use of children, southwest of the Mall, 1866. Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1867.

1866: Northern end of the Park

The Brook.

The Brook, 1866. Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1867.

Glen Span Bridge. For an earlier sketch, see 1863.

Glen Span Bridge, 1866. Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1867.

The Blockhouse (far left) and view of Harlem Heights. The Extension (106th to 110th Streets) was purchased in part because of the historical associations of the Blockhouse: more on that in a blog post soon. (Search this site to see if I’ve gotten to it yet.) The land for the Extension  was purchased in 1863.

The Blockhouse and the view of Harlem Heights, 1866. Image: InternetBookArchive

The Blockhouse in the 1860s.

The blockhouse in the 1860s. Image: New York Public Library

1867: Southern end of the Park

Bethesda Terrace’s decorations were completed by 1867.

Photo of Bethesda Terrace ramp, 1867. 11th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

Photo of pillars at Bethesda Terrace, 1867. 11th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

The exquisitely elegant and colorful Music Pavilion was the center of musical performances on the Mall.

Photo of music day on the Mall in Central Park, 1867. The Music Pavilion by Jacob Wrey Mould is at the center. 11th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

The Mineral Water Pavilion at the northwest edge of the Sheep Meadow was in a colorful Moorish style: see the fabulous write-up (with photos) by Daytonian in Manhattan. This drawing appeared in the annual report of the Board of Commissioners of Central Park in 1867, while the pavilion was still in the planning stage. The pavilion was razed in 1957, under Robert Moses.

Mineral Water Pavilion, 1867. 11th Annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

The Dairy opened in Central Park in the late 1860s. This drawing appeared in the annual report of the Board of Commissioners of Central Park in 1868, while it was still in the planning stage. On the Dairy and the “Swill Milk Scandal,” see my post on ForgottenDelights.com. For more on the Dairy’s history, see Daytonian in Manhattan.

The Dairy, 1868. Annual report of the Board of Commissioners of Central Park, 1869.

Bow Bridge, 1867. Photo from 11th Annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

Elegant fountain for watering horses, at the carriage turn-around on Cherry Hill, just south of the Lake. It still stands. The much larger fountain by Mould that has been reconstructed in City Hall Park in the 1990s is a close relative.

Cherry Hill, drinking fountain for horses. 11th Annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

Also on Cherry Hill: Tigress by Auguste Cain. See this post for details.

Photo of Cain’s Tigress on Cherry Hill, 1867. 11th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

Children at the Lake. Photo from 11th Annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

In this view of the Ramble from across the Lake, the trees are only a few years old.

The Lake, 1867. Photo from 11th Annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

The Rustic Arch in the Ramble.

Photo of the Rustic Arch in the Ramble, 1867. 11th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1868.

1868: Northern end of the Park

Cascade, 1868. 12th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1869.

The Board does seem to have a fascination with running water. “Dripping Rocks” made it to the annual report for 1868.

Dripping rocks, 1868. 12th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1869.

Entrance to the Cave, 1868. 12th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1869.

1868: Southern end of the Park

Working on the children’s areas. This is the boys’ playground, in the southwest corner of the Park. What is that building in the background?

Photo of boys’ playground, 1868. 12th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1869.

Children’s shelter, 1868. 12th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1869.

Children’s cottage, 1868. 12th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1869.

Arbor east of the playground, 1868. 12th annual report of the Board of Commissioners, published 1869.

1869: Southern end of the Park

Tigress and Cubs, by Auguste Cain, was placed on Cherry Hill in 1866. For the peacock joke and Clarence Cook’s thoughts on Tigress, see this post.

Auguste Cain, Tigress and Cubs, placed in Central Park in 1866. Image: A Description of the New York Central Park, 1869

More

  • This page is a work in progress: bookmark it, or follow me on Twitter @NYCsculpture to be notified when new images are added.
  • Central Park: The Early Years covers Central Park from the 1850s to 1870s. Details here, or order on Amazon here.
  • Want wonderful art delivered weekly to your inbox? Members of my free Sunday Recommendations list (email DuranteDianne@gmail.com) receive three art-related suggestions every week: check out my favorites from last year’s recommendations. For more goodies, check out my Patreon page.